Tag Archives: Worry

Reflecting The Light

If you feel yourself overwhelmed from time to time by the darkness in the world, be it from current events in the news, or personal struggles, I wanted to offer some encouragement today that might lighten the burden.

The American writer Edith Wharton once wrote, “There are two ways of spreading light: to be the candle or the mirror that reflects it.” Even when we find ourselves with so little light to share, the one thing sure to enhance our defense against the darkness is reflecting the light we encounter. When we act as a mirror, amplifying the light, we light the way for others.

1In that spirit, here are seven simple ways to cast or reflect light:

  1. Send a simple, honest compliment out of the blue.
  2. Give people hope through direct assistance.
  3. Introduce someone to a helpful resource.
  4. Provide pathways to free education and hands-on learning.
  5. Introduce two of your friends who do not know one another yet.
  6. Include people in efforts for common (or community) good.
  7. Find opportunities to be a good listener.

The next time you despair, rouse your waning energy to attempt one of these seven small acts. Though they may not solve all of your problems, or reverse the course of the world, they will give you a lift and light your way forward.

All the best, Cindy

Action Cures Worry

At times, uncertainty can plague us. Nothing robs us of today’s real joys like the worries over tomorrow’s possible disasters. Unfortunately, in our attempts to predict the future, we shortchange ourselves of the moment we’re living. While there is a place for common sense preparation in our lives — i.e. preparing a hurricane kit, keeping an eye out for plumbing leaks, changing the batteries in our smoke detectors — pure panic about the days to come serves us not at all.

Or does it? What are we getting out of all this worry about our future? Why do we feel compelled to fret about catastrophe?

Worrying is a form of control. It isn’t a terribly effective one, as events beyond our control remain beyond our control, but it helps us maintain the illusion that we’re engaged with or vigilant about what threatens us. If you’ve ever felt like your problems will strike just at the moment you let down your guard, you may be addicted to worrying as a form of control.

Instead of worrying, I would instead offer you this alternative: Turn your fear and anxiety into direct action. Sometimes these actions may be small. It may mean joining a civic group matching your interests or writing local politicians about something you feel important. It may mean making small changes in your diet or exercise plan to help your health. It may take the form of meeting with a friend or counselor to voice your fears and put them in perspective.

Do what you can do, and try to put aside the “crutch” of worry. Trade it in for gratitude for what you have within your grasp, be it friends, family, or a simple cup of coffee and time to reflect.

All the very best,